Highgate Cemetery

I had an amazing day touring Highgate cemetery. The cemetery consists of an east and a west side. In the east side you can walk freely around, but the west side which is older, requires a tour for you to access it. Outside near the cemetery entrance were these interesting chimneys, each having its own individual pattern.


Straight away the entrance looks imposing. Our tour lady told us lots of interesting things about the place such as to get the body across the road (where im standing) to the east cemetery, they had an underground tunnel so that they didn’t have to cross the road. It is currently waterlogged but they are trying to restore it.


It was very overcast all day and with all the trees overshadowing the cemetery it made it hard for photography. Wasn’t allowed tripods, and even if you was, at the speed the tour was going I wouldn’t have been able to use it anyway. This was the only bad thing really, the tour was interesting and i’m glad I learned some interesting facts about the place but I would have liked to wander off afterwards and taken photos without being rushed. I could have easily spent all day in the place. The one time I did lag behind I got called to ‘are you coming?!‘ To which she explained later she wasn’t allowed anyone out of sight as some people book tours and wander off with the intentions of scattering ashes of their loved ones in the cemetery without permission, which I found quite amusing to be honest.


Some parts of the cemetery had a very ‘Indian Jones’ feel to them.




This pyramid-shaped grave was the 11th grave put in the west side cemetery.



This is the grave of Thomas Sayers, who was a bare-knuckle prize fighter. There were no weight divisions back then and his final fight against an American, John Heenan, is regarded as the world’s first boxing championship. This match lasted 40 rounds, a match only ended when a fighter was knocked down, so between them they had been knocked down 40 times! The match ended in a draw when the crowd flooded the ring. The dog guarding his tomb was Sayers’s constant companion called Leo, or Lion.





Highgate cemetery is well worth visiting, though it is rather annoying that you are forced to have a tour to see the west side. The tour is only an hour long and I feel we only got to see a fraction of the place. Despite this I thoroughly enjoyed myself, I would love to have the opportunity to explore the west side of the cemetery and discover at my own leisure.

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10 Comments

Filed under Photography

10 responses to “Highgate Cemetery

  1. really good man especially Thomas Sayers one with lion

  2. Really nice photography Reiss! They work really well as a series, and in the monotones. Looks like a great place for it too! 🙂

  3. Sofie

    Such talent you harbour, i really do envy your artistic eye.
    A beautiful collection, you are wonderfully incredible ❤

  4. Wow, it’s an incredibly beautiful cemetery, and you’re shots are really poignant…My favourite is the close up of the angel, man, but that’s brilliant. Great work!

    • Thank you! The cemetery is amazing, I am going to ask them if I can go around at my own pace at some point, as getting rushed around whilst trying to get good shots grows bothersome after a while. Thanks for looking!

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