Horniman Museum

Leanne and I visited the Horniman Museum.  The Museum has been open since Victorian times and contains ‘internationally important collections of anthropology and musical instruments, as well as an acclaimed aquarium and natural history collection.’

Horniman Museum

Flying Gurnard (Dactylopterus volitans). They can’t fly however ‘they have been observed to “walk” along sandy sea floors while looking for crustaceans and other small invertebrates by using their pelvic fins.’

Horniman Museum
Yellow-Bellied Pangolin (Manis Tricuspis). ‘The tree pangolin can walk on all fours or on its hind legs using its prehensile tail for balance. It can climb up trees in the absence of branches. When walking on all fours, it walks on its front knuckles with its claws tucked underneath to protect them from wearing down.’ ‘When threatened, it rolls up into a ball, protecting itself with its thick skin and scales. Its scales cover its entire body except for the belly, snout, eyes, ears, and undersides of the limbs. When a mother with young is threatened, it rolls up around the young, which also roll into a ball. While in a ball, it can extend its scales and make a cutting action by using muscles to move the scales back and forth. It makes an aggressive huff noise when threatened, but that is the extent of its noise-making.’

Horniman Museum

Flying Fox (Pteropus Medius). ‘The large flying fox has a wingspan up to 1.5 m (4 ft 11 in)’. ‘Characteristically, all species of flying foxes only feed on nectar, blossom, pollen, and fruit, which explains their limited tropical distribution. They do not possess echolocation, a feature which helps the other suborder of bats, the microbats, locate and catch prey such as insects in mid-air’

Horniman Museum
Horniman Museum
Horniman Museum
Horniman Museum
Horniman Museum
Horniman Museum
Moon Jellyfish (Aurelia aurita). ‘The jellyfish is translucent, usually about 25–40 cm (10–16 in) in diameter, and can be recognized by its four horseshoe-shaped gonads, easily seen through the top of the bell. It feeds by collecting medusae, plankton, and mollusks with its tentacles, and bringing them into its body for digestion. It is capable of only limited motion, and drifts with the current, even when swimming.’

Horniman Museum
Horniman Museum

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